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THE GUTENBERG WEBSTER'S UNABRIDGED DICTIONARY BY PROJECT GUTENBERG

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] [49] [50] [51] [52] [53] [54] [55] [56] [57] [58] [59] [60] [61] [62] [63] [64] [65] [66] [67] [68] [69] [70] [71] [72] [73] [74] [75] [76] [77] [78] [79]

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ARUNDELIAN

ARUNDELIAN Ar`un*delian, a. Defn: Pertaining to an Earl of Arundel; as, Arundel or Arundelian marbles, marbles from ancient Greece, bought by the Earl of Arundel in 1624.

ARUNDIFEROUS

ARUNDIFEROUS Ar`un*difer*ous, a. Etym: [L. arundifer; arundo reed + ferre to bear.] Defn: Producing reeds or canes.

ARUNDINACEOUS

ARUNDINACEOUS A*run`di*naceous, a. Etym: [L. arundinaceus, fr. arundo reed.] Defn: Of or pertaining to a reed; resembling the reed or cane.

ARUNDINEOUS

ARUNDINEOUS Ar`un*dine*ous, a. Etym: [L. arundineus, fr. arundo reed.] Defn: Abounding with reeds; reedy.

ARUSPEX

ARUSPEX A*ruspex, n.; pl. Aruspices. Etym: [L. aruspex or haruspex.] Defn: One of the class of diviners among the Etruscans and Romans, who foretold events by the inspection of the entrails of victims offered on the altars of the gods.

ARUSPICE

ARUSPICE A*ruspice, n. Etym: [L. aruspex: cf. F. aruspice. Cf. Aruspex, Haruspice.] Defn: A soothsayer of ancient Rome. Same as Aruspex. [Written also haruspice.]

ARUSPICY

ARUSPICY A*ruspi*cy, n. Etym: [L. aruspicium, haruspicium.] Defn: Prognostication by inspection of the entrails of victims slain sacrifice.

ARVAL

ARVAL Arval, n. Etym: [W. arwyl funeral; ar over + wylo to weep, or cf. arf?l; Icel. arfr inheritance + Sw. ?l ale. Cf. Bridal.] Defn: A funeral feast. [North of Eng.] Grose.

ARVICOLE

ARVICOLE Arvi*cole, n. Etym: [L. arvum field + colere to inhabit.] (Zo?l.) Defn: A mouse of the genus Arvicola; the meadow mouse. There are many species.

ARYAN

ARYAN Aryan, n. Etym: [Skr. arya excellent, honorable; akin to the name of the country Iran, and perh. to Erin, Ireland, and the early name of this people, at least in Asia.] 1. One of a primitive people supposed to have lived in prehistoric times, in Central Asia, east of the Caspian Sea, and north of the Hindoo 2. The language of the original Aryans. [Written also Arian.]

ARYAN

ARYAN Aryan, a. Defn: Of or pertaining to the people called Aryans; Indo-European; Indo-Germanic; as, the Aryan stock, the Aryan languages.

ARYANIZE

ARYANIZE Aryan*ize, v. t. Defn: To make Aryan (a language, or in language). K. Johnston.

ARYTENOID

ARYTENOID A*ryte*noid, a. Etym: [Gr. (Anat.) Defn: Ladle-shaped; -- applied to two small cartilages of the larynx, and also to the glands, muscles, etc., connected with them. The cartilages are attached to the cricoid cartilage and connected with the vocal cords.

AS

AS. abredgan to shake, draw; pref. a- (cf. Goth. us-, Ger. er-, orig. meaning out) + bregdan to shake, throw. See Braid.] Defn: To awake; to arouse; to stir or start up; also, to shout out. [Obs.] Chaucer.

AS

AS. acolian to grow cold; pref. a- (cf. Goth. er-, orig. meaning out) + colian to cool. See Cool.] Defn: Cold. [Obs.] Poor Tom's acold. Shak.

AS

AS. ange oppressed, sad, L. angor a strangling, anguish, angere to strangle, Gr. amhas pain, and to. anguish, anxious, quinsy, and perh. awe, ugly. The word seems to have orig. meant to choke, squeeze. 1. Trouble; vexation; also, physical pain or smart of a sore, etc. [Obs.] I made the experiment, setting the moxa where . . . the greatest anger and soreness still continued. Temple. 2. A strong passion or emotion of displeasure or antagonism, excited by a real or supposed injury or insult to one's self or others, or by the intent to do such injury. Anger is like A full hot horse, who being allowed his way, Self- mettle tires him. Shak. Syn. -- Resentment; wrath; rage; fury; passion; ire gall; choler; indignation; displeasure; vexation; grudge; spleen. -- Anger, Indignation, Resentment, Wrath, Ire, Rage, Fury. Anger is a feeling of keen displeasure (usually with a desire to punish) for what we regard as wrong toward ourselves or others. It may be excessive or misplaced, but is not necessarily criminal. Indignation is a generous outburst of anger in view of things which are indigna, or unworthy to be done, involving what is mean, cruel, flagitious, etc., in character or conduct. Resentment is often a moody feeling, leading one to brood over his supposed personal wrongs with a deep and lasting anger. See Resentment. Wrath and ire (the last poetical) express the feelings of one who is bitterly provoked. Rage is a vehement ebullition of anger; and fury is an excess of rage, amounting almost to madness. Warmth of constitution often gives rise to anger; a high sense of honor creates indignation at crime; a man of quick sensibilities is apt to cherish resentment; the wrath and ire of men are often connected with a haughty and vindictive spirit; rage and fury are distempers of the soul to be regarded only with abhorrence.

AS

AS. on in + an one. See On and One.] 1. Straightway; at once. [Obs.] The same is he that heareth the word, and anon with joy receiveth it. Matt. xiii. 20. 2. Soon; in a little while. As it shall better appear anon. Stow. 3. At another time; then; again. Sometimes he trots, . . . anon he rears upright. Shak. Anon right, at once; right off. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- Ever and anon, now and then; frequently; often. A pouncet box, which ever and anon He gave his nose. Shak.

AS

AS As, adv. & conj. Etym: [OE. as, als, alse, also, al swa, AS. eal swa, lit. all so; hence, quite so, quite as: cf. G. als as, than, also so, then. See Also.] 1. Denoting equality or likeness in kind, degree, or manner; like; similar to; in the same manner with or in which; in accordance with; in proportion to; to the extent or degree in which or to which; equally; no less than; as, ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil; you will reap as you sow; do as you are bidden. His spiritual attendants adjured him, as he loved his soul, to emancipate his brethren. Macaulay. Note: As is often preceded by one of the antecedent or correlative words such, same, so, or as, in expressing an equality or comparison; as, give us such things as you please, and so long as you please, or as long as you please; he is not so brave as Cato; she is as amiable as she is handsome; come as quickly as possible. Bees appear fortunately to prefer the same colors as we do. Lubbock. As, in a preceding part of a sentence, has such or so to answer correlatively to it; as with the people, so with the priest. 2. In the idea, character, or condition of, -- limiting the view to certain attributes or relations; as, virtue considered as virtue; this actor will appear as Hamlet. The beggar is greater as a man, than is the man merely as a king. Dewey. 3. While; during or at the same time that; when; as, he trembled as he spoke. As I return I will fetch off these justices. Shak. 4. Because; since; it being the case that. As the population of Scotland had been generally trained to arms . . . they were not indifferently prepared. Sir W. Scott. [See Synonym under Because.] 5. Expressing concession. (Often approaching though in meaning). We wish, however, to avail ourselves of the interest, transient as it may be, which this work has excited. Macaulay. 6. That, introducing or expressing a result or consequence, after the correlatives so and such. [Obs.] I can place thee in such abject state, as help shall never find thee. Rowe. So as, so that. [Obs.] The relations are so uncertain as they require a great deal of examination. Bacon. 7. As if; as though. [Obs. or Poetic] He lies, as he his bliss did know. Waller. 8. For instance; by way of example; thus; -- used to introduce illustrative phrases, sentences, or citations. 9. Than. [Obs. & R.] The king was not more forward to bestow favors on them as they free to deal affronts to others their superiors. Fuller. 10. Expressing a wish. [Obs.] As have, i. e., may he have. Chaucer. As . . . as. See So . . . as, under So. -- As far as, to the extent or degree. As far as can be ascertained. Macaulay. -- As far forth as, as far as. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- As for, or As to, in regard to; with respect to. -- As good as, not less than; not falling short of. -- As good as one's word, faithful to a promise. -- As if, or As though, of the same kind, or in the same condition or manner, that it would be if. -- As it were (as if it were), a qualifying phrase used to apologize for or to relieve some expression which might be regarded as inappropriate or incongruous; in a manner. -- As now, just now. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- As swythe, as quickly as possible. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- As well, also; too; besides. Addison. -- As well as, equally with, no less than. I have understanding as well as you. Job xii. 3. -- As yet, until now; up to or at the present time; still; now.

AS

AS As, n. Etym: [See Ace.] Defn: An ace. [Obs.] Chaucer. Ambes-as, double aces.

AS

AS As, n.; pl. Asses. Etym: [L. as. See Ace.] 1. A Roman weight, answering to the libra or pound, equal to nearly eleven ounces Troy weight. It was divided into twelve ounces. 2. A Roman copper coin, originally of a pound weight (12 oz.); but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and afterwards to half an ounce.

AS

AS. be?g, be?h, bracelet, collar, crown, OS b in comp., AS. b to bow, bend, G. biegen. See Bow to bend.] 1. A distinctive mark, token, sign, or cognizance, worn on the person; as, the badge of a society; the badge of a policeman. Tax gatherers, recognized by their official badges. Prescott. 2. Something characteristic; a mark; a token. Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge. Shak. 3. (Naut.) Defn: A carved ornament on the stern of a vessel, containing a window or the representation of one.

AS

AS. bel.] Defn: To lock, or fasten as with a lock. [Obs.] Shak.

AS

AS. cwide a saying, becwe to bequeath. The ending -est is probably due to confusion with quest. See Bequeath, Quest.] 1. The act of bequeathing or leaving by will; as, a bequest of property by A. to B. 2. That which is left by will, esp. personal property; a legacy; also, a gift.

AS

AS. byht, fr. b. sq. root88. Cf. Bout, Bought a bend, and see Bow, v.] 1. A corner, bend, or angle; a hollow; as, the bight of a horse's knee; the bight of an elbow. 2. (Geog.) Defn: A bend in a coast forming an open bay; as, the Bight of Benin. 3. (Naut.) Defn: The double part of a rope when folded, in distinction from the ends; that is, a round, bend, or coil not including the ends; a loop.

AS

AS. blonden-feax gray-haired, old, prop. blended-haired, as a mixture of white and brown or black. See Blend, v. t. ] Defn: Of a fair color; light-colored; as, blond hair; a blond complexion.

AS

AS. beorgan to hide, save, defend, G. bergen; or perh. from that of

AS

AS. beorg hill, mountain. Bury, v. t., and cf. Burrow, Burg, Bury, n., Burgess, Iceberg, Borrow, Harbor, Hauberk.] 1. In England, an incorporated town that is not a city; also, a town that sends members to parliament; in Scotland, a body corporate, consisting of the inhabitants of a certain district, erected by the sovereign, with a certain jurisdiction; in America, an incorporated town or village, as in Pennsylvania and Connecticut. Burrill. Erskine. 2. The collective body of citizens or inhabitants of a borough; as, the borough voted to lay a tax. Close borough, or Pocket borough, a borough having the right of sending a member to Parliament, whose nomination is in the hands of a single person. -- Rotten borough, a name given to any borough which, at the time of the passage of the Reform Bill of 1832, contained but few voters, yet retained the privilege of sending a member to Parliament.

AS

AS. bredan, bregdan, to braid, knit, (hence) to knit a net, to draw into a net, i.e., to deceive. See Braid, v. t.] Defn: Deceitful. [Obs.] Since Frenchmen are so braid, Marry that will, I live and die a maid. Shak.

AS

AS. hlafes brice, fr. the root of E. break. See Break.] 1. A block or clay tempered with water, sand, etc., molded into a regular form, usually rectangular, and sun-dried, or burnt in a kiln, or in a heap or stack called a clamp. The Assyrians appear to have made much less use of bricks baked in the furnace than the Babylonians. Layard. 2. Bricks, collectively, as designating that kind of material; as, a load of brick; a thousand of brick. Some of Palladio's finest examples are of brick. Weale. 3. Any oblong rectangular mass; as, a brick of maple sugar; a penny brick (of bread). 4. A good fellow; a merry person; as, you 're a brick. [Slang] He 's a dear little brick. Thackeray. To have a brick in one's hat, to be drunk. [Slang] Note: Brick is used adjectively or in combination; as, brick wall; brick clay; brick color; brick red. Brick clay, clay suitable for, or used in making, bricks. -- Brick dust, dust of pounded or broken bricks. -- Brick earth, clay or earth suitable for, or used in making, bricks. -- Brick loaf, a loaf of bread somewhat resembling a brick in shape. -- Brick nogging (Arch.), rough brickwork used to fill in the spaces between the uprights of a wooden partition; brick filling. -- Brick tea, tea leaves and young shoots, or refuse tea, steamed or mixed with fat, etc., and pressed into the form of bricks. It is used in Northern and Central Asia. S. W. Williams. -- Brick trimmer (Arch.), a brick arch under a hearth, usually within the thickness of a wooden floor, to guard against accidents by fire. -- Brick trowel. See Trowel. -- Brick works, a place where bricks are made. -- Bath brick. See under Bath, a city. -- Pressed brick, bricks which, before burning, have been subjected to pressure, to free them from the imperfections of shape and texture which are common in molded bricks.

AS

AS. br bride + guma man, akin to Goth. guma, Icel. gumi, OHG. gomo, L. homo; the insertion of r being caused by confusion with groom. See Bride, and cf. Groom, Homage.] Defn: A man newly married, or just about to be married.

AS

AS. brad; akin to OS. bred, D. breed, G. breit, Icel. brei, Sw. & Dan. bred, Goth. braids. Cf. Breadth.] 1. Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; -- opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad. 2. Extending far and wide; extensive; vast; as, the broad expanse of ocean. 3. Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full. Broad and open day. Bp. Porteus. 4. Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; -- applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending largely on the substantive. A broad mixture of falsehood. Locke. Note: Hence: - 5. Comprehensive; liberal; enlarged. The words in the Constitution are broad enough to include the case. D. Daggett. In a broad, statesmanlike, and masterly way. E. Everett. 6. Plain; evident; as, a broad hint. 7. Free; unrestrained; unconfined. As broad and general as the casing air. Shak. 8. (Fine Arts) Defn: Characterized by breadth. See Breadth. 9. Cross; coarse; indelicate; as, a broad compliment; a broad joke; broad humor. 10. Strongly marked; as, a broad Scotch accent. Note: Broad is often used in compounds to signify wide, large, etc.; as, broad-chested, broad-shouldered, broad-spreading, broad-winged. Broad acres. See under Acre. -- Broad arrow, originally a pheon. See Pheon, and Broad arrow under Arrow. -- As broad as long, having the length equal to the breadth; hence, the same one way as another; coming to the same result by different ways or processes. It is as broad as long, whether they rise to others, or bring others down to them. L'Estrange. Broad pennant. See under Pennant. Syn. -- Wide; large; ample; expanded; spacious; roomy; extensive; vast; comprehensive; liberal.

AS

AS. bellan, E. bellow.] 1. (Zo?l.) Defn: The male of any species of cattle (Bovid?); hence, the male of any large quadruped, as the elephant; also, the male of the whale. Note: The wild bull of the Old Testament is thought to be the oryx, a large species of antelope. 2. One who, or that which, resembles a bull in character or action. Ps. xxii. 12. 3. (Astron.) (a) Taurus, the second of the twelve signs of the zodiac. (b) A constellation of the zodiac between Aries and Gemini. It contains the Pleiades. At last from Aries rolls the bounteous sun, And the bright Bull receives him. Thomson. 4. (Stock Exchange) Defn: One who operates in expectation of a rise in the price of stocks, or in order to effect such a rise. See 4th Bear, n., 5. Bull baiting, the practice of baiting bulls, or rendering them furious, as by setting dogs to attack them. -- John Bull, a humorous name for the English, collectively; also, an Englishman. Good-looking young John Bull. W. D.Howells. -- To take the bull by the horns, to grapple with a difficulty instead of avoiding it.

AS

AS. cunnan, 1st sing. pres. ic cann or can, pl. cunnon, 1st sing. imp. cu\'ebe (for cunthe); p. p. cu\'eb (for cunth); akin to OS. Kunnan, D. Kunnen, OHG. chunnan, G. k?nnen, Icel. kunna, Goth. Kunnan, and E. ken to know. The present tense I can (AS. ic cann) was originally a preterit, meaning I have known or Learned, and hence I know, know how. *45. See Ken, Know; cf. Con, Cunning, Uncouth.] 1. To know; to understand. [Obs.] I can rimes of Rodin Hood. Piers Plowman. I can no Latin, quod she. Piers Plowman. Let the priest in surplice white, That defunctive music can. Shak. 2. To be able to do; to have power or influence. [Obs.] The will of Him who all things can. Milton. For what, alas, can these my single arms Shak. M?c?nas and Agrippa, who can most with C?sar. Beau. & Fl. 3. To be able; -- followed by an infinitive without to; as, I can go, but do not wish to. Syn. -- Can but, Can not but. It is an error to use the former of these phrases where the sens requires the latter. If we say, I can but perish if I go, But means only, and denotes that this is all or the worst that can happen. When the apostle Peter said. We can not but speak of the things which we have seen and heard. he referred to a moral constraint or necessety which rested upon him and his associates; and the meaning was, We cannot help speaking, We cannot refrain from speaking. This idea of a moral necessity or constraint is of frequent occurrence, and is also expressed in the phrase, I can not help it. Thus we say. I can not but hope, I can not but believe, I can not but think, I can not but remark, etc., in cases in which it would be an error to use the phrase can but. Yet he could not but acknowledge to himself that there was something calculated to impress awe, . . . in the sudden appearances and vanishings . . . of the masque De Quincey. Tom felt that this was a rebuff for him, and could not but understand it as a left-handed hit at his employer. Dickens.

AS

AS. circe, cyrice; akin to D. kerk, Icel. kirkja, Sw. kyrka, Dan. kirke, G. kirche, OHG. chirihha; all fr. Gr. ?\'d4ra hero, Zend. ?ura strong, OIr. caur, cur, hero. Cf. Kirk.] 1. A building set apart for Christian worship. 2. A Jewish or heathen temple. [Obs.] Acts xix. 37. 3. A formally organized body of Christian believers worshiping together. When they had ordained them elders in every church. Acts xiv. 23. 4. A body of Christian believers, holding the same creed, observing the same rites, and acknowledging the same ecclesiastical authority; a denomination; as, the Roman Catholic church; the Presbyterian church. 5. The collective body of Christians. 6. Any body of worshipers; as, the Jewish church; the church of Brahm. 7. The aggregate of religious influences in a community; ecclesiastical influence, authority, etc.; as, to array the power of the church against some moral evil. Remember that both church and state are properly the rulers of the people, only because they are their benefactors. Bulwer. Note: Church is often used in composition to denote something belonging or relating to the church; as, church authority; church history; church member; church music, etc. Apostolic church. See under Apostolic. -- Broad church. See Broad Church. -- Catholic or Universal church, the whole body of believers in Christ throughout the world. -- Church of England, or English church, the Episcopal church established and endowed in England by law. -- Church living, a benefice in an established church. -- Church militant. See under Militant. -- Church owl (Zo?l.), the white owl. See Barn owl. -- Church rate, a tax levied on parishioners for the maintenance of the church and its services. -- Church session. See under Session. -- Church triumphant. See under Triumphant. -- Church work, work on, or in behalf of, a church; the work of a particular church for the spread of religion. -- Established church, the church maintained by the civil authority; a state church.

AS

AS. cl; akin to OHG. chleini pure, neat, graceful, small, G. klein small, and perh. to W. glan clean, pure, bright; all perh. from a primitive, meaning bright, shining. Cf. Glair.] 1. Free from dirt or filth; as, clean clothes. 2. Free from that which is useless or injurious; without defects; as, clean land; clean timber. 3. Free from awkwardness; not bungling; adroit; dexterous; as, aclean trick; a clean leap over a fence. 4. Free from errors and vulgarisms; as, a clean style. 5. Free from restraint or neglect; complete; entire. When ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of corners of thy field. Le 6. Free from moral defilement; sinless; pure. Create in me a clean heart, O God. Ps. li. 10 That I am whole, and clean, and meet for Heaven Tennyson. 7. (Script.) Defn: Free from ceremonial defilement. 8. Free from that which is corrupting to the morals; pure in tone; healthy. Lothair is clean. F. Harrison. 9. Well-proportioned; shapely; as, clean limbs. A clean bill of health, a certificate from the proper authrity that a ship is free from infection. -- Clean breach. See under Breach, n., 4. -- To make a clean breast. See under Breast.

AS

AS. cald, ceald; akin to OS. kald, D. koud, G. kalt, Icel. kaldr, Dan. kold, Sw. kall, Goth. kalds, L. gelu frost, gelare to freeze. Orig. p. p. of AS. calan to be cold, Icel. kala to freeze. Cf. Cool, a., Chill, n.] 1. Deprived of heat, or having a low temperature; not warm or hot; gelid; frigid. The snowy top of cold Olympis. Milton. 2. Lacking the sensation of warmth; suffering from the absence of heat; chilly; shivering; as, to be cold. 3. Not pungent or acrid. Cold plants. Bacon 4. Wanting in ardor, intensity, warmth, zeal, or passion; spiritless; unconcerned; reserved. A cold and unconcerned spectator. T. Burnet. No cold relation is a zealous citizen. Burke. 5. Unwelcome; disagreeable; unsatisfactory. Cold news for me. Cold comfort. Shak. 6. Wanting in power to excite; dull; uninteresting. What a deal of cold business doth a man misspend the better part of life in! B. Jonson. The jest grows cold . . . when in comes on in a second scene. Addison. 7. Affecting the sense of smell (as of hunting dogs) but feebly; having lost its odor; as, a cold scent. 8. Not sensitive; not acute. Smell this business with a sense as cold As is a dead man's nose. Shak. 9. Distant; -- said, in the game of hunting for some object, of a seeker remote from the thing concealed. 10. (Paint.) Defn: Having a bluish effect. Cf. Warm, 8. Cold abscess. See under Abscess. -- Cold blast See under Blast, n., 2. Cold blood. See under Blood, n., 8. -- Cold chill, an ague fit. Wright. -- Cold chisel, a chisel of peculiar strength and hardness, for cutting cold metal. Weale. -- Cold cream. See under Cream. -- Cold slaw. See Cole slaw. -- In cold blood, without excitement or passion; deliberately. He was slain in cold blood after thefight was over. Sir W. Scott. To give one the cold shoulder, to treat one with neglect. Syn. -- Gelid; bleak; frigid; chill; indifferent; unconcerned; passionless; reserved; unfeeling; stoical.

AS

AS. heals, G. & Goth. hals. Cf. Hals, n.] 1. Something worn round the neck, whether for use, ornament, restraint, or identification; as, the collar of a coat; a lady's collar; the collar of a dog. 2. (Arch.) (a) A ring or cinture. (b) A collar beam. 3. (Bot.) Defn: The neck or line of junction between the root of a plant and its stem. Gray. 4. An ornament worn round the neck by knights, having on it devises to designate their rank or order. 5. (Zo?l.) (a) A ringlike part of a mollusk in connection with esophagus. (b) A colored ring round the neck of a bird or mammal. 6. (Mech.) Defn: A ring or round flange upon, surrounding, or against an object, and used for rastraining motion within given limits, or for holding something to its place, or for hibing an opening around an object; as, a collar on a shaft, used to prevent endwise motion of the shaft; a collar surrounding a stovepipe at the place where it enters a wall. The flanges of a piston and the gland of a stuffing box are sometimes called collars. 7. (Naut.) Defn: An eye formed in the bight or bend of a shroud or stay to go over the masthead; also, a rope to which certain parts of rigging, as dead-eyes, are secured. 8. (Mining) Defn: A curb, or a horizontal timbering, around the mouth of a shaft. Raymond. Collar beam (Arch.), a horizontal piece of timber connecting and tying together two opposite rafters; -- also, called simply collar. -- Collar of brawn, the quantity of brawn bound up in one parcel. [Eng.] Johnson. -- Collar day, a day of great ceremony at the English court, when persons, who are dignitaries of honorary orders, wear the collars of those orders. -- To slip the collar, to get free; to disentangle one's self from difficulty, labor, or engagement. Spenser.

AS

AS. de?re; akin to OS. diuri, D. duur, OHG. tiuri, G. theuer, teuer, Icel. d, Dan. & Sw. dyr. Cf. Darling, Dearth.] 1. Bearing a high price; high-priced; costly; expensive. The cheapest of us is ten groats too dear. Shak. 2. Marked by scarcity or dearth, and exorbitance of price; as, a dear year. 3. Highly valued; greatly beloved; cherished; precious. Hear me, dear lady. Shak. Neither count I my life dear unto myself. Acts xx. 24. And the last joy was dearer than the rest. Pope. Dear as remember'd kisses after death. Tennyson. 4. Hence, close to the heart; heartfelt; present in mind; engaging the attention. (a) Of agreeable things and interests. [I'll] leave you to attend him: some dear cause Will in concealment wrap me up awhile. Shak. His dearest wish was to escape from the bustle and glitter of Whitehall. Macaulay. (b) Of disagreeable things and antipathies. In our dear peril. Shak. Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven Or ever I had seen that day. Shak.

AS

AS. dw foolish, G. thor fool. Daze, Doze.] 1. Having in the head a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to fall; vertiginous; giddy; hence, confused; indistinct. Alas! his brain was dizzy. Drayton. 2. Causing, or tending to cause, giddiness or vertigo. To climb from the brink of Fleet Ditch by a dizzy ladder. Macaulay. 3. Without distinct thought; unreflecting; thoughtless; heedless. The dizzy multitude. Milton.

AS

AS. dragan to draw. See Draw, and cf. Draught.] 1. The act of drawing; also, the thing drawn. Same as Draught. Everything available for draft burden. S. G. Goodrich. 2. (Mil.) Defn: A selecting or detaching of soldiers from an army, or from any part of it, or from a military post; also from any district, or any company or collection of persons, or from the people at large; also, the body of men thus drafted. Several of the States had supplied the deficiency by drafts to serve for the year. Marshall. 3. An order from one person or party to another, directing the payment of money; a bill of exchange. I thought it most prudent to deter the drafts till advice was received of the progress of the loan. A. Hamilton. 4. An allowance or deduction made from the gross veight of goods. Simmonds. 5. A drawing of lines for a plan; a plan delineated, or drawn in outline; a delineation. See Draught. 6. The form of any writing as first drawn up; the first rough sketch of written composition, to be filled in, or completed. See Draught. 7. (Masonry) (a) A narrow border left on a finished stone, worked differently from the rest of its face. (b) A narrow border worked to a plane surface along the edge of a stone, or across its face, as a guide to the stone-cutter. 8. (Milling) Defn: The slant given to the furrows in the dress of a millstone. 9. (Naut.) Defn: Depth of water necessary to float a ship. See Draught. 10. A current of air. Same as Draught.

AS

AS. dryge; akin to LG. dr?ge, D. droog, OHG. trucchan, G. trocken, Icel. draugr a dry log. Cf. Drought, Drouth, 3d Drug.] 1. Free from moisture; having little humidity or none; arid; not wet or moist; deficient in the natural or normal supply of moisture, as rain or fluid of any kind; -- said especially: (a) Of the weather: Free from rain or mist. The weather, we agreed, was too dry for the season. Addison. (b) Of vegetable matter: Free from juices or sap; not succulent; not green; as, dry wood or hay. (c) Of animals: Not giving milk; as, the cow is dry. (d) Of persons: Thirsty; needing drink. Give the dry fool drink. Shak (e) Of the eyes: Not shedding tears. Not a dry eye was to be seen in the assembly. Prescott. (f) (Med.) Defn: Of certain morbid conditions, in which there is entire or comparative absence of moisture; as, dry gangrene; dry catarrh. 2. Destitute of that which interests or amuses; barren; unembellished; jejune; plain. These epistles will become less dry, more susceptible of ornament. Pope. 3. Characterized by a quality somewhat severe, grave, or hard; hence, sharp; keen; shrewd; quaint; as, a dry tone or manner; dry wit. He was rather a dry, shrewd kind of body. W. Irving. 4. (Fine Arts) Defn: Exhibiting a sharp, frigid preciseness of execution, or the want of a delicate contour in form, and of easy transition in coloring. Dry area (Arch.), a small open space reserved outside the foundation of a building to guard it from damp. -- Dry blow. (a) (Med.) A blow which inflicts no wound, and causes no effusion of blood. (b) A quick, sharp blow. -- Dry bone (Min.), Smithsonite, or carbonate of zinc; -- a miner's term. -- Dry castor (Zo?l.) a kind of beaver; -- called also parchment beaver. -- Dry cupping. (Med.) See under Cupping. -- Dry dock. See under Dock. -- Dry fat. See Dry vat (below). -- Dry light, pure unobstructed light; hence, a clear, impartial view. Bacon. The scientific man must keep his feelings under stern control, lest they obtrude into his researches, and color the dry light in which alone science desires to see its objects. J. C. Shairp. -- Dry masonry. See Masonry. -- Dry measure, a system of measures of volume for dry or coarse articles, by the bushel, peck, etc. -- Dry pile (Physics), a form of the Voltaic pile, constructed without the use of a liquid, affording a feeble current, and chiefly useful in the construction of electroscopes of great delicacy; -- called also Zamboni's , from the names of the two earliest constructors of it. -- Dry pipe (Steam Engine), a pipe which conducts dry steam from a boiler. -- Dry plate (Photog.), a glass plate having a dry coating sensitive to light, upon which photographic negatives or pictures can be made, without moistening. -- Dry-plate process, the process of photographing with dry plates. -- Dry point. (Fine Arts) (a) An engraving made with the needle instead of the burin, in which the work is done nearly as in etching, but is finished without the use acid. (b) A print from such an engraving, usually upon paper. (c) Hence: The needle with which such an engraving is made. -- Dry rent (Eng. Law), a rent reserved by deed, without a clause of distress. Bouvier. -- Dry rot, a decay of timber, reducing its fibers to the condition of a dry powdery dust, often accompanied by the presence of a peculiar fungus (Merulius lacrymans), which is sometimes considered the cause of the decay; but it is more probable that the real cause is the decomposition of the wood itself. D. C. Eaton. Called also sap rot, and, in the United States, powder post. Hebert. -- Dry stove, a hothouse adapted to preserving the plants of arid climates. Brande & C. -- Dry vat, a vat, basket, or other receptacle for dry articles. -- Dry wine, that in which the saccharine matter and fermentation were so exactly balanced, that they have wholly neutralized each other, and no sweetness is perceptible; -- opposed to sweet wine, in which the saccharine matter is in excess.

AS

AS. dwellan to deceive, hinder, delay, dwelian to err; akin to Icel. dvelja to delay, tarry, Sw. dv?ljas to dwell, Dan. dv?le to linger, and to E. dull. See Dull, and cf. Dwale.] 1. To delay; to linger. [Obs.] 2. To abide; to remain; to continue. I 'll rather dwell in my necessity. Shak. Thy soul was like a star and dwelt apart. Wordsworth. 3. To abide as a permanent resident, or for a time; to live in a place; to reside. The parish in which I was born, dwell, and have possessions. Peacham. The poor man dwells in a humble cottage near the hall where the lord of the domain resides. C. J. Smith. To dwell in, to abide in (a place); hence, to depend on. My hopes in heaven to dwell. Shak. -- To dwell on or upon, to continue long on or in; to remain absorbed with; to stick to; to make much of; as, to dwell upon a subject; a singer dwells on a note. They stand at a distance, dwelling on his looks and language, fixed in amazement. Buckminster. Syn. -- To inhabit; live; abide; sojourn; reside; continue; stay; rest.

AS

AS. forgietan, forgitan; pref. for- + gietan, gitan (only in comp.), to get; cf. D. vergeten, G. vergessen, Sw. f?rg?ta, Dan. forgiette. See For-, and Get, v. t.] 1. To lose the remembrance of; to let go from the memory; to cease to have in mind; not to think of; also, to lose the power of; to cease from doing. Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits. Ps. ciii. 2. Let y right hand forget her cunning. Ps. cxxxvii. 5. Hath thy knee forget to bow Shak. 2. To treat with inattention or disregard; to slight; to neglect. Can a woman forget her sucking child . . . Yes, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee. Is. xlix. 15. To forget one's self. (a) To become unmindful of one's own personality; to be lost in thought. (b) To be entirely unselfish. (c) To be guilty of what is unworthy of one; to lose one's dignity, temper, or self-control.

AS

AS. franca javelin, Icel. frakka. Cf. Franc, French, a., Franchise, n.] 1. Unbounded by restrictions, limitations, etc.; free. [R.] It is of frank gift. Spenser. 2. Free in uttering one's real sentiments; not reserved; using no disguise; candid; ingenuous; as, a frank nature, conversation, manner, etc. 3. Liberal; generous; profuse. [Obs.] Frank of civilities that cost them nothing. L'Estrange. 4. Unrestrained; loose; licentious; -- used in a bad sense. Spenser. Syn. -- Ingenuous; candid; artless; plain; open; unreserved; undisguised; sincere. See Candid, Ingenuous.

AS

AS. fersc; akin to D. versch, G. frisch, OHG. frisc, Sw. frisk, Dan. frisk, fersk, Icel. fr frisky, brisk, ferskr fresh; cf. It. fresco,

AS

AS. fur, far; akin to G. f?rder. See Forth, adv.] Defn: To a greater distance; in addition; moreover. See Farther. Carries us, I know not how much further, into familiar company. M. Arnold. They sdvanced us far as Eleusis and Thria; but no further. Jowett (Thucyd. ). Further off, not so near; apart by a greater distance.

AS

AS. galga, gealga, gallows, cross; akin to D. galg gallows, OS. &

AS

AS. ginan to yawn, and E. yawn. Yawn, v. i., and cf. Begin.] Defn: To begin; -- often followed by an infinitive without to; as, gan tell. See Gan. [Obs. or Archaic] He gan to pray. Chaucer.

AS

AS. grg, grg; akin to D. graauw OHG. gro, G. grau, Dan. graa, Dw. gr, Icel. grdr.] [Written also grey.] 1. White mixed with black, as the color of pepper and salt, or of ashes, or of hair whitened by age; sometimes, a dark mixed color; as, the soft gray eye of a dove. These gray and dun colors may be also produced by mixing whites and blacks. Sir I. Newton. 2. Gray-haired; gray-headed; of a gray color; hoary. 3. Old; mature; as, gray experience. Ames. Gray antimony (Min.), stibnite. -- Gray buck (Zo?l.), the chickara. -- Gray cobalt (Min.), smaltite. -- Gray copper (Min.), tetrahedrite. -- Gray duck (Zo?l.), the gadwall; also applied to the female mallard. -- Gray falcon (Zo?l.) the peregrine falcon. -- Gray Friar. See Franciscan, and Friar. -- Gray hen (Zo?l.), the female of the blackcock or black grouse. See Heath grouse. -- Gray mill or millet (Bot.), a name of several plants of the genus Lithospermum; gromwell. -- Gray mullet (Zo?l.) any one of the numerous species of the genus Mugil, or family Mugilid?, found both in the Old World and America; as the European species (M. capito, and M. auratus), the American striped mullet (M. albula), and the white or silver mullet (M. Braziliensis). See Mullet. -- Gray owl (Zo?l.), the European tawny or brown owl (Syrnium aluco). The great gray owl (Ulula cinerea) inhabits arctic America. -- Gray parrot (Zo?l.), a parrot (Psittacus erithacus), very commonly domesticated, and noted for its aptness in learning to talk. -- Gray pike. (Zo?l.) See Sauger. -- Gray snapper (Zo?l.), a Florida fish; the sea lawyer. See Snapper. -- Gray snipe (Zo?l.), the dowitcher in winter plumage. -- Gray whale (Zo?l.), a rather large and swift California whale (Rhachianectes glaucus), formerly taken in large numbers in the bays; -- called also grayback, devilfish, and hardhead.

AS

AS. grne; akin to D. groen, OS. grni, OHG. gruoni, G. grn, Dan. & Sw. grn, Icel. grnn; fr. the root of E. grow. See Grow.] 1. Having the color of grass when fresh and growing; resembling that color of the solar spectrum which is between the yellow and the blue; verdant; emerald. 2. Having a sickly color; wan. To look so green and pale. Shak. 3. Full of life aud vigor; fresh and vigorous; new; recent; as, a green manhood; a green wound. As valid against such an old and beneficent government as against . . . the greenest usurpation. Burke. 4. Not ripe; immature; not fully grown or ripened; as, green fruit, corn, vegetables, etc. 5. Not roasted; half raw. [R.] We say the meat is green when half roasted. L. Watts. 6. Immature in age or experience; young; raw; not trained; awkward; as, green in years or judgment. I might be angry with the officious zeal which supposes that its green conceptions can instruct my gray hairs. Sir W. Scott. 7. Not seasoned; not dry; containing its natural juices; as, green wood, timber, etc. Shak. Green brier (Bot.), a thorny climbing shrub (Emilaz rotundifolia) having a yellowish green stem and thick leaves, with small clusters of flowers, common in the United States; -- called also cat brier. -- Green con (Zo?l.), the pollock. -- Green crab (Zo?l.), an edible, shore crab (Carcinus menas) of Europe and America; -- in New England locally named joe-rocker. -- Green crop, a crop used for food while in a growing or unripe state, as distingushed from a grain crop, root crop, etc. -- Green diallage. (Min.) (a) Diallage, a variety of pyroxene. (b) Smaragdite. -- Green dragon (Bot.), a North American herbaceous plant (Aris?ma Dracontium), resembling the Indian turnip; -- called also dragon root. -- Green earth (Min.), a variety of glauconite, found in cavities in amygdaloid and other eruptive rock, and used as a pigment by artists; -- called also mountain green. -- Green ebony. (a) A south American tree (Jacaranda ovalifolia), having a greenish wood, used for rulers, turned and inlaid work, and in dyeing. (b) The West Indian green ebony. See Ebony. -- Green fire (Pyrotech.), a composition which burns with a green flame. It consists of sulphur and potassium chlorate, with some salt of barium (usually the nitrate), to which the color of the flame is due. -- Green fly (Zo?l.), any green species of plant lice or aphids, esp. those that infest greenhouse plants. -- Green gage, (Bot.) See Greengage, in the Vocabulary. -- Green gland (Zo?l.), one of a pair of large green glands in Crustacea, supposed to serve as kidneys. They have their outlets at the bases of the larger antenn?. -- Green hand, a novice. [Colloq.] -- Green heart (Bot.), the wood of a lauraceous tree found in the West Indies and in South America, used for shipbuilding or turnery. The green heart of Jamaica and Guiana is the Nectandra Rodioei, that of Martinique is the Colubrina ferruginosa. -- Green iron ore (Min.) dufrenite. -- Green laver (Bot.), an edible seaweed (Ulva latissima); -- called also green sloke. -- Green lead ore (Min.), pyromorphite. -- Green linnet (Zo?l.), the greenfinch. -- Green looper (Zo?l.), the cankerworm. -- Green marble (Min.), serpentine. -- Green mineral, a carbonate of copper, used as a pigment. See Greengill. -- Green monkey (Zo?l.) a West African long-tailed monkey (Cercopithecus callitrichus), very commonly tamed, and trained to perform tricks. It was introduced into the West Indies early in the last century, and has become very abundant there. -- Green salt of Magnus (Old Chem.), a dark green crystalline salt, consisting of ammonia united with certain chlorides of platinum. -- Green sand (Founding) molding sand used for a mold while slightly damp, and not dried before the cast is made. -- Green sea (Naut.), a wave that breaks in a solid mass on a vessel's deck. -- Green sickness (Med.), chlorosis. -- Green snake (Zo?l.), one of two harmless American snakes (Cyclophis vernalis, and C. ?stivus). They are bright green in color. -- Green turtle (Zo?l.), an edible marine turtle. See Turtle. -- Green vitriol. (a) (Chem.) Sulphate of iron; a light green crystalline substance, very extensively used in the preparation of inks, dyes, mordants, etc. (b) (Min.) Same as copperas, melanterite and sulphate of iron. -- Green ware, articles of pottery molded and shaped, but not yet baked. -- Green woodpecker (Zo?l.), a common European woodpecker (Picus viridis); -- called also yaffle.

AS

AS. gresan to frighten, and E. gruesome.] Defn: Frightful; horrible; dreadful; harsh; as, grisly locks; a grisly specter. Grisly to behold. Chaucer. A man of grisly and stern gravity. Robynson (More's Utopia). Grisly bear. (Zo?l.) See under Grizzly.

AS

AS. ge?tan to pour, G. giessen, Goth. giutan, E. gut. Cf. Found to cast.] 1. To issue with violence and rapidity, as a fluid; to rush forth as a fluid from confinement; to flow copiously. He smote the rock that the waters gushed out. Ps ixxviii 20. A sea of blood gushed from the gaping wound. Spenser. 2. To make a sentimental or untimely exhibition of affection; to display enthusiasm in a silly, demonstrative manner. [Colloq.]

AS

AS. he?h, fr. heah high; akin to D. hoogte, Sw. h?jd, Dan. h?ide, Icel. h?, Goth. hauhipa. See High.] 1. The condition of being high; elevated position. Behold the height of the stars, how high they are! Job xxii. 12. 2. The distance to which anything rises above its foot, above that on which in stands, above the earth, or above the level of the sea; altitude; the measure upward from a surface, as the floor or the ground, of animal, especially of a man; stature. Bacon. [Goliath's] height was six cubits and a span. 1 Sam. xvii. 4. 3. Degree of latitude either north or south. [Obs.] Guinea lieth to the north sea, in the same height as Peru to the south. Abp. Abbot. 4. That which is elevated; an eminence; a hill or mountain; as, Alpine heights. Dryden. 5. Elevation in excellence of any kind, as in power, learning, arts; also, an advanced degree of social rank; pre?minence or distinction in society; prominence. Measure your mind's height by the shade it casts. R. Browning. All would in his power hold, all make his subjects. Chapman. 6. Progress toward eminence; grade; degree. Social duties are carried to greater heights, and enforced with stronger motives by the principles of our religion. Addison. 7. Utmost degree in extent; extreme limit of energy or condition; as, the height of a fever, of passion, of madness, of folly; the height of a tempest. My grief was at the height before thou camest. Shak. On height, aloud. [Obs.] [He] spake these same words, all on hight. Chaucer.

AS

AS. hentan, gehentan, to pursue, take, seize; cf. Icel. henda, Goth. hinpan (in compos.), and E. hunt.] Defn: To seize; to lay hold on; to catch; to get. [Obs.] Piers Plowman. Spenser. This cursed Jew him hente and held him fast. Chaucer. But all that he might of his friendes hente On bookes and on learning he it spente. Chaucer.

AS

AS.halig, fr. h?l health, salvation, happiness, fr. hal whole, well; akin to OS. h, D. & G.heilig, OHG. heilac, Dan. hellig, Sw. helig, Icel. heilagr. See Whole, and cf. Halibut, Halidom, Hallow, Hollyhock.] 1. Set apart to the service or worship of God; hallowed; sacred; reserved from profane or common use; holy vessels; a holy priesthood. Holy rites and solemn feasts. Milton. 2. Spiritually whole or sound; of unimpaired innocence and virtue; free from sinful affections; pure in heart; godly; pious; irreproachable; guiltless; acceptable to God. Now through her round of holy thought The Church our annual steps has brought. Keble. Holy Alliance (Hist.), a league ostensibly for conserving religion, justice, and peace in Europe, but really for repressing popular tendencies toward constitutional government, entered into by Alexander I. of Russia, Francis I. of Austria, and Frederic William

AS

AS. cnapa boy, youth, D. kna, G. knabe boy, knappe esquire, Icel. knapi, Sw. knape esquire, kn?fvel knave.] 1. A boy; especially, a boy servant. [Obs.] Wyclif. Chaucer. O murderous slumber, Lay'st thou thy leaden mace upon my boy That plays thee music Gentle knave, good night. Shak. 2. Any male servant; a menial. [Obs.] Chaucer. He's but Fortune's knave, A minister of her will. Shak. 3. A tricky, deceitful fellow; a dishonest person; a rogue; a villain. A pair of crafty knaves. Shak. In defiance of demonstration, knaves will continue to proselyte fools. Ames. Note: How many serving lads must have been unfaithful and dishonest before knave -which meant at first no more than boy -- acquired the meaning which it has now ! Trench. 4. A playing card marked with the figure of a servant or soldier; a jack. Knave child, a male child. [Obs.] Chaucer. Syn. -- Villain; cheat; rascal; rogue; scoundrel; miscreant.

AS

AS. wancol wavering; cf. G. wanken to stagger, waver. See Leap, and Wink.] (Zo?l.) Defn: A small European bird of the Plover family (Vanellus cristatus, or V. vanellus). It has long and broad wings, and is noted for its rapid, irregular fight, upwards, downwards, and in circles. Its back is coppery or greenish bronze. Its eggs are the plover's eggs of the London market, esteemed a delicacy. It is called also peewit, dastard plover, and wype. The gray lapwing is the Squatarola cinerea.

AS

AS. l to teach, OS. lerian, OHG.leran, G. lehren, Goth. laisjan, also Goth lais I know, leis acquainted (in comp.); all prob. from a root meaning, to go, go over, and hence, to learn; cf. AS. leoran to go . Cf. Last a mold of the foot, lore.] 1. To gain knowledge or information of; to ascertain by inquiry, study, or investigation; to receive instruction concerning; to fix in the mind; to acquire understanding of, or skill; as, to learn the way; to learn a lesson; to learn dancing; to learn to skate; to learn the violin; to learn the truth about something. Learn to do well. Is. i. 17. Now learn a parable of the fig tree. Matt. xxiv. 32. 2. To communicate knowledge to; to teach. [Obs.] Hast thou not learned me how To make perfumes Shak. Note: Learn formerly had also the sense of teach, in accordance with the analogy of the French and other languages, and hence we find it with this sense in Shakespeare, Spenser, and other old writers. This usage has now passed away. To learn is to receive instruction, and to teach is to give instruction. He who is taught learns, not he who teaches.

AS

AS. geliman to glue or join together. See Lime a viscous substance.] 1. To smear with a viscous substance, as birdlime. These twigs, in time, will come to be limed. L'Estrange. 2. To entangle; to insnare. We had limed ourselves With open eyes, and we must take the chance. Tennyson. 3. To treat with lime, or oxide or hydrate of calcium; to manure with lime; as, to lime hides for removing the hair; to lime sails in order to whiten them. Land may be improved by draining, marling, and liming. Sir J. Child. 4. To cement. Who gave his blood to lime the stones together. Shak.

AS

AS. lytig deceitful, lot deceit, Goth. liuts deceitful, lut to deceive; cf. also Icel. litill little, Sw. liten, Dan. liden, lille, Goth. leitils, which appear to have a different root vowel.] 1. Small in size or extent; not big; diminutive; -- opposed to big or large; as, a little body; a little animal; a little piece of ground; a little hill; a little distance; a little child. He sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because he was little of stature. Luke xix. 3. 2. Short in duration; brief; as, a little sleep. Best him enough: after a little time, I'll beat him too. Shak. 3. Small in quantity or amount; not much; as, a little food; a little air or water. Conceited of their little wisdoms, and doting upon their own fancies. Barrow. 4. Small in dignity, power, or importance; not great; insignificant; contemptible. When thou wast little in thine own sight, wast thou not made the head of the tribes I Sam. xv. 17. 5. Small in force or efficiency; not strong; weak; slight; inconsiderable; as, little attention or exertion;little effort; little care or diligence. By sad experiment I know How little weight my words with thee can find. Milton. 6. Small in extent of views or sympathies; narrow; shallow; contracted; mean; illiberal; ungenerous. The long-necked geese of the world that are ever hissing dispraise, Because their natures are little. Tennyson. Little chief. (Zo?l.) See Chief hare. -- Little finger, the fourth and smallest finger of the hand. -- Little go (Eng. Universities), a public examination about the middle of the course, which as less strict and important than the final one; -- called also smalls. Cf. Great go, under Great. Thackeray. -- Little hours (R. C. Ch.), the offices of prime, tierce, sext, and nones. Vespers and compline are sometimes included. -- Little ones, young children. The men, and the women, and the little ones. Deut. ii. 34.

AS

AS. gem common, general, D. gemeen, G. gemein, Goth. gam?ins, and L. communis. The AS. gem prob. influenced the meaning.] 1. Destitute of distinction or eminence; common; low; vulgar; humble. Of mean parentage. Sir P. Sidney. The mean man boweth down, and the great man humbleth himself. Is. ii. 9. 2. Wanting dignity of mind; low-minded; base; destitute of honor; spiritless; as, a mean motive. Can you imagine I so mean could prove, To save my life by changing of my love Dryden. 3. Of little value or account; worthy of little or no regard; contemptible; despicable. The Roman legions and great C?sar found Our fathers no mean foes. J. Philips. 4. Of poor quality; as, mean fare. 5. Penurious; stingy; close-fisted; illiberal; as, mean hospitality. Note: Mean is sometimes used in the formation of compounds, the sense of which is obvious without explanation; as, meanborn, mean-looking, etc. Syn. -- Base; ignoble; abject; beggarly; wretched; degraded; degenerate; vulgar; vile; servile; menial; spiritless; groveling; slavish; dishonorable; disgraceful; shameful; despicable; contemptible; paltry; sordid. See Base.

AS

AS. mistel is akin of D., G., Dan. & Sw. mistel, OHG. mistil, Icel. mistilteinn; and AS. tan to D. teen, OHG. zein, Icel. teinn, Goth. tains. Cf. Missel.] (Bot.) Defn: A parasitic evergreen plant of Europe (Viscum album), bearing a glutinous fruit. When found upon the oak, where it is rare, it was an object of superstitious regard among the Druids. A bird lime is prepared from its fruit. [Written also misletoe, misseltoe, and mistleto.] Lindley. Loudon. Note: The mistletoe of the United States is Phoradendron flavescens, having broader leaves than the European kind. In different regions various similar plants are called by this name.

AS

AS. pr?ttig, pr?tig, crafty, sly, akin to pr?t, pr?tt, deceit, trickery, Icel. prettugr tricky, prettr a trick; probably fr. Latin, perhaps through Celtic; cf. W. praith act, deed, practice, LL. practica execution, practice, plot. See Practice.] 1. Pleasing by delicacy or grace; attracting, but not striking or impressing; of a pleasing and attractive form a color; having slight or diminutive beauty; neat or elegant without elevation or grandeur; pleasingly, but not grandly, conceived or expressed; as, a pretty face; a pretty flower; a pretty poem. This is the prettiest lowborn lass that ever Ran on the greensward. Shak. 2. Moderately large; considerable; as, he had saved a pretty fortune. Wavering a pretty while. Evelyn. 3. Affectedly nice; foppish; -- used in an ill sense. The pretty gentleman is the most complaisant in the world. Spectator. 4. Mean; despicable; contemptible; -- used ironically; as, a pretty trick; a pretty fellow. 5. Stout; strong and brave; intrepid; valiant. [Scot.] [He] observed they were pretty men, meaning not handsome. Sir W. Scott. Syn. -- Elegant; neat; fine. See Handsome.

AS

AS. pumic-stan. Cf. Pounce a powder, Spume.] (Min.) Defn: A very light porous volcanic scoria, usually of a gray color, the pores of which are capillary and parallel, giving it a fibrous structure. It is supposed to be produced by the disengagement of watery vapor without liquid or plastic lava. It is much used, esp. in the form of powder, for smoothing and polishing. Called also pumice stone.

AS

AS. rypan, also Sw. repa to ripple flax, D. repelen, G. reffen, riffeln, and E. raff, raffle. Cf. Raff, Ripple of flax.] 1. To divide or separate the parts of, by cutting or tearing; to tear or cut open or off; to tear off or out by violence; as, to rip a garment by cutting the stitches; to rip off the skin of a beast; to rip up a floor; -- commonly used with up, open, off. 2. To get by, or as by, cutting or tearing. He 'll rip the fatal secret from her heart. Granville. 3. To tear up for search or disclosure, or for alteration; to search to the bottom; to discover; to disclose; -- usually with up. They ripped up all that had been done from the beginning of the rebellion. Clarendon. For brethern to debate and rip up their falling out in the ear of a common enemy . . . is neither wise nor comely. Milton. 4. To saw (wood) lengthwise of the grain or fiber. Ripping chisel (Carp.), a crooked chisel for cleaning out mortises. Knight. -- Ripping iron. (Shipbuilding) Same as Ravehook. -- Ripping saw. (Carp.) See Ripsaw. -- To rip out, to rap out, to utter hastily and violently; as, to rip out an oath. [Colloq.] See To rap out, under Rap, v. t.

AS

AS. scolde, sceolde. See Shall.] Defn: Used as an auxiliary verb, to express a conditional or contingent act or state, or as a supposition of an actual fact; also, to express moral obligation (see Shall); e. g.: they should have come last week; if I should go; I should think you could go. You have done that you should be sorry for. Shak. Syn. -- See Ought.

AS

AS. se?c; akin to OS. siok, seoc, OFries. siak, D. ziek, G. siech,

AS

AS. sweostor, sweoster, swuster, akin to OFries. sweester, suster,

AS

AS. slaw; akin to OS. sl blunt, dull, D. sleeuw, slee, sour, OHG. sl blunt, dull, Icel. sl, sl, Dan. sl?v, Sw. sl?. Cf. Sloe, and Sloth.] 1. Moving a short space in a relatively long time; not swift; not quick in motion; not rapid; moderate; deliberate; as, a slow stream; a slow motion. 2. Not happening in a short time; gradual; late. These changes in the heavens, though slow, produced Like change on sea and land, sidereal blast. Milton. 3. Not ready; not prompt or quick; dilatory; sluggish; as, slow of speech, and slow of tongue. Fixed on defense, the Trojans are not slow To guard their shore from an expected foe. Dryden. 4. Not hasty; not precipitate; acting with deliberation; tardy; inactive. He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding. Prov. xiv. 29. 5. Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time; as, the clock or watch is slow. 6. Not advancing or improving rapidly; as, the slow growth of arts and sciences. 7. Heavy in wit; not alert, prompt, or spirited; wearisome; dull. [Colloq.] Dickens. Thackeray. Note: Slow is often used in the formation of compounds for the most part self-explaining; as, slow-gaited, slow-paced, slow-sighted, slow-winged, and the like. Slow coach, a slow person. See def.7, above. [Colloq.] -- Slow lemur, or Slow loris (Zo?l.), an East Indian nocturnal lemurine animal (Nycticebus tardigradus) about the size of a small cat; -- so called from its slow and deliberate movements. It has very large round eyes and is without a tail. Called also bashful Billy. -- Slow match. See under Match. Syn. -- Dilatory; late; lingering; tardy; sluggish; dull; inactive. -- Slow, Tardy, Dilatory. Slow is the wider term, denoting either a want of rapid motion or inertness of intellect. Dilatory signifies a proneness to defer, a habit of delaying the performance of what we know must be done. Tardy denotes the habit of being behind hand; as, tardy in making up one's acounts.

AS

AS. smgan to creep. See Smock.] 1. To import or export secretly, contrary to the law; to import or export without paying the duties imposed by law; as, to smuggle lace. 2. Fig.: To convey or introduce clandestinely.

AS

AS. swefn sleep. Cf. Hypnotic, Somnambulism, Soporific.] Defn: Sleepy; drowsy; inclined to sleep. -- Somno*lent*ly, adv. He had no eye for such phenomens, because he had a somnolent want of interest in them. De Quincey.

AS

AS. spir; akin to G. spier a blade of grass, Dan. spire a sprout, sprig, Sw. spira a spar, Icel. spira.] 1. A slender stalk or blade in vegetation; as, a spire grass or of wheat. An oak cometh up a little spire. Chaucer. 2. A tapering body that shoots up or out to a point in a conical or pyramidal form. Specifically (Arch.), the roof of a tower when of a pyramidal form and high in proportion to its width; also, the pyramidal or aspiring termination of a tower which can not be said to have a roof, such as that of Strasburg cathedral; the tapering part of a steeple, or the steeple itself. With glistering spires and pinnacles adorned. Milton. A spire of land that stand apart, Cleft from the main. Tennyson. Tall spire from which the sound of cheerful bells Just undulates upon the listening ear. Cowper. 3. (Mining) Defn: A tube or fuse for communicating fire to the chargen in blasting. 4. The top, or uppermost point, of anything; the summit. The spire and top of praises. Shak.

AS

AS. stigend (sc. e?ge eye), properly, rising, or swelling (eye), p.p. of stigan to rise. See Sty, v. i.] (Med.) Defn: An inflamed swelling or boil on the edge of the eyelid. [Written also stye.]

AS

AS. swogan to sough, sigh; cf. geswogen senseless, swooned, geswowung a swooning. Cf. Sough.] Defn: To sink into a fainting fit, in which there is an apparent suspension of the vital functions and mental powers; to faint; -- often with away. The sucklings swoon in the streets of the city. Lam. ii. 11. The most in years . . . swooned first away for pain. Dryden. He seemed ready to swoon away in the surprise of joy. Tatler.

AS

AS. edhu, edhu; akin to OS. & OFries. thu, G., Dan. & Sw. du, Icel. ?u, Goth. ?u, Russ. tui, Ir. & Gael. tu, W. ti, L. tu, Gr. sy`, Dor. ty`, Skr. tvam. *185. Cf. Thee, Thine, Te Deum.] Defn: The second personal pronoun, in the singular number, denoting the person addressed; thyself; the pronoun which is used in addressing persons in the solemn or poetical style. Art thou he that should come Matt. xi. 3. Note: In Old English, generally, thou is the language of a lord to a servant, of an equal to an equal, and expresses also companionship, love, permission, defiance, scorn, threatening: whilst ye is the language of a servant to a lord, and of compliment, and further expresses honor, submission, or entreaty. Skeat. Note: Thou is now sometimes used by the Friends, or Quakers, in familiar discourse, though most of them corruptly say thee instead of thou.

AS

AS. to twist. See Throw, and cf. Third.] 1. A very small twist of flax, wool, cotton, silk, or other fibrous substance, drawn out to considerable length; a compound cord consisting of two or more single yarns doubled, or joined together, and twisted. 2. A filament, as of a flower, or of any fibrous substance, as of bark; also, a line of gold or silver. 3. The prominent part of the spiral of a screw or nut; the rib. See Screw, n., 1. 4. Fig.: Something continued in a long course or tenor; a,s the thread of life, or of a discourse. Bp. Burnet. 5. Fig.: Composition; quality; fineness. [Obs.] A neat courtier, Of a most elegant thread. B. Jonson. Air thread, the fine white filaments which are seen floating in the air in summer, the production of spiders; gossamer. -- Thread and thrum, the good and bad together. [Obs.] Shak. -- Thread cell (Zo?l.), a lasso cell. See under Lasso. -- Thread herring (Zo?l.), the gizzard shad. See under Gizzard. -- Thread lace, lace made of linen thread. -- Thread needle, a game in which children stand in a row, joining hands, and in which the outer one, still holding his neighbor, runs between the others; -- called also thread the needle.

AS

AS. str. See Strike, v. t.] Defn: To flow in a small, gentle stream; to run in drops. His salt tears trickled down as rain. Chaucer. Fast beside there trickled softly down A gentle stream. Spenser.

AS

AS. cyedhan to make known, fr. cuedh known. See Uncouth.] 1. Odd; strange; ugly; old; uncouth. [Prov. Eng.] 2. Lonely; dreary; unkard. [Prov. Eng.] Weston is sadly unked without you. Cowper.

AS

AS. re?fan to break.] Defn: Not torn, split, or parted; not torn to pieces. [Obs.] Bp. Hall.

AS

AS. togen, p. p. of te?n to draw, to educate, bring up; hence, properly, ill bred. See Tug, v. t.] 1. Untrained; undisciplined; unrestrained; hence, loose; free; luxuriant; roving; sportive. In woods and wanton wilderness. Spenser. A wild and wanton herd. Shak. A wanton and a merry [friar]. Chaucer. [She] her unadorned golden tresses wore Disheveled, but in wanton ringlets waved. Milton. How does your tongue grow wanton in her praise! Addison. 2. Wandering from moral rectitude; perverse; dissolute. Men grown wanton by prosperity. Roscommon. 3. Specifically: Deviating from the rules of chastity; lewd; lustful; lascivious; libidinous; lecherous. Not with wanton looking of folly. Chaucer. [Thou art] froward by nature, enemy to peace, Lascivious, wanton. Shak. 4. Reckless; heedless; as, wanton mischief.

AS

AS. weste. Cf. Vast.] 1. Desolate; devastated; stripped; bare; hence, dreary; dismal; gloomy; cheerless. The dismal situation waste and wild. Milton. His heart became appalled as he gazed forward into the waste darkness of futurity. Sir W. Scott. 2. Lying unused; unproductive; worthless; valueless; refuse; rejected; as, waste land; waste paper. But his waste words returned to him in vain. Spenser. Not a waste or needless sound, Till we come to holier ground. Milton. Ill day which made this beauty waste. Emerson. 3. Lost for want of occupiers or use; superfluous. And strangled with her waste fertility. Milton. Waste gate, a gate by which the superfluous water of a reservoir, or the like, is discharged. -- Waste paper. See under Paper. -- Waste pipe, a pipe for carrying off waste, or superfluous, water or other fluids. Specifically: (a) (Steam Boilers) An escape pipe. See under Escape. (b) (Plumbing) The outlet pipe at the bottom of a bowl, tub, sink, or the like. -- Waste steam. (a) Steam which escapes the air. (b) Exhaust steam. -- Waste trap, a trap for a waste pipe, as of a sink.

AS

AS. wefan; akin to D. weven, G. weben, OHG. weban, Icel. vefa, Sw. v?fva, Dan. v?ve, Gr. spider, lit., wool weaver. Cf. Waper, Waffle, Web, Weevil, Weft, Woof.] 1. To unite, as threads of any kind, in such a manner as to form a texture; to entwine or interlace into a fabric; as, to weave wool, silk, etc.; hence, to unite by close connection or intermixture; to unite intimately. This weaves itself, perforce, into my business. Shak. That in their green shops weave the smooth-haired silk To deck her sons. Milton. And for these words, thus woven into song. Byron. 2. To form, as cloth, by interlacing threads; to compose, as a texture of any kind, by putting together textile materials; as, to weave broadcloth; to weave a carpet; hence, to form into a fabric; to compose; to fabricate; as, to weave the plot of a story. When she weaved the sleided silk. Shak. Her starry wreaths the virgin jasmin weaves. Ld. Lytton.

AS

AS., OS., & OHG. galan to sing, Icel. gala. Cf. 1st Gale, and Nightingale.] Defn: To cry out, or shriek, with a hideous noise; to cry or scream as with agony or horror. They yelleden as feendes doon in helle. Chaucer. Nor the night raven, that still deadly yells. Spenser. Infernal ghosts and hellish furies round Environed thee; some howled, some yelled. Milton.

AS

AS. geond, adv. & prep.; cf. Goth. jaind thither. sq. root188. See Yon, a.] Defn: Yonder. [Obs.] Yond in the garden. Chaucer.

ASA

ASA Asa, n. Etym: [NL. asa, of oriental origin; cf. Per. aza mastic, Ar. asa healing, isa remedy.] Defn: An ancient name of a gum.

ASAFETIDA; ASAFOETIDA

ASAFETIDA; ASAFOETIDA As`a*feti*da, As`a*foeti*da, n. Etym: [Asa + L. foetidus fetid.] Defn: The fetid gum resin or inspissated juice of a large umbelliferous plant (Ferula asafoetida) of Persia and the East India. It is used in medicine as an antispasmodic. [Written also assafoetida.]

ASAPHUS

ASAPHUS Asa*phus, n. Etym: [NL., fr. Gr. (Paleon.) Defn: A genus of trilobites found in the Lower Silurian formation. See Illust. in Append.

ASARABACCA

ASARABACCA As`a*ra*bacca, n. Etym: [L. asarum + bacca a berry. See Asarone.] (Bot.) Defn: An acrid herbaceous plant (Asarum Europ?um), the leaves and roots of which are emetic and cathartic. It is principally used in cephalic snuffs.

ASARONE

ASARONE Asa*rone, n. Etym: [L. asarum hazelwort, wild spikenard, Gr. (Chem.) Defn: A crystallized substance, resembling camphor, obtained from the Asarum Europ?um; -- called also camphor of asarum.

ASBESTIC

ASBESTIC As*bestic, a. Defn: Of, pertaining to, or resembling asbestus; inconsumable; asbestine.

ASBESTIFORM

ASBESTIFORM As*besti*form, a. Etym: [L. asbestus + -form.] Defn: Having the form or structure of asbestus.

ASBESTINE

ASBESTINE As*bestine, a. Defn: Of or pertaining to asbestus, or partaking of its nature; incombustible; asbestic.

ASBESTOUS

ASBESTOUS As*bestous, a. Defn: Asbestic.

ASBESTUS; ASBESTOS

ASBESTUS; ASBESTOS As*bestus, As*bestos, n. Etym: [L. asbestos (NL. asbestus) a kind of mineral unaffected by fire, Gr. (Min.) Defn: A variety of amphibole or of pyroxene, occurring in long and delicate fibers, or in fibrous masses or seams, usually of a white, gray, or green-gray color. The name is also given to a similar variety of serpentine. Note: The finer varieties have been wrought into gloves and cloth which are incombustible. The cloth was formerly used as a shroud for dead bodies, and has been recommended for firemen's clothes. Asbestus in also employed in the manufacture of iron safes, for fireproof roofing, and for lampwicks. Some varieties are called amianthus. Dana.

ASBOLIN

ASBOLIN Asbo*lin, n. Etym: [Gr. (Chem.) Defn: A peculiar acrid and bitter oil, obtained from wood soot.

ASCARIASIS

ASCARIASIS As`ca*ria*sis, n. [NL., fr. Gr. an intestinal worm.] (Med.) Defn: A disease, usually accompanied by colicky pains and diarrhea, caused by the presence of ascarids in the gastrointestinal canal.

ASCARID

ASCARID Asca*rid, n.; pl. Ascarides or Ascarids. Etym: [NL. ascaris, fr. Gr. (Zo?l.) Defn: A parasitic nematoid worm, espec. the roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, often occurring in the human intestine and allied species found in domestic animals; also commonly applied to the pinworm (Oxyuris), often troublesome to children and aged persons.

ASCEND

ASCEND As*cend, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Ascended; p. pr. & vb. n. Ascending.] Etym: [L. ascendere; ad + scandere to climb, mount. See Scan.] 1. To move upward; to mount; to go up; to rise; -- opposed to Ant: descend. Higher yet that star ascends. Bowring. I ascend unto my father and your father. John xx. 17. Note: Formerly used with up. The smoke of it ascended up to heaven. Addison. 2. To rise, in a figurative sense; to proceed from an inferior to a superior degree, from mean to noble objects, from particulars to generals, from modern to ancient times, from one note to another more acute, etc.; as, our inquiries ascend to the remotest antiquity; to ascend to our first progenitor. Syn. -- To rise; mount; climb; scale; soar; tower.

ASCEND

ASCEND As*cend, v. t. Defn: To go or move upward upon or along; to climb; to mount; to go up the top of; as, to ascend a hill, a ladder, a tree, a river, a throne.

ASCENDABLE

ASCENDABLE As*cenda*ble, a. Defn: Capable of being ascended.

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